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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all .....now looking for input on riding with a passenger. Looking to know what the bike handles like etc...and do i need to do anything to the rear to handle the extra weight. I heard theres something i would need to adjust??? I weigh 210 pounds and my girl is 130 pounds....i really want to take her riding with me...does anyone see a potential problem. Were not looking to go super fast or anything just enjoy some leisure cruising.
 

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I found it to be pretty horrible. Response is pretty laggy, and the power is all but oblitterated.

Cornering with nonriders on the back is an experience in its own aswell.

I've done it a few times now with a few different people.. But I'm certainly not making a habbit of it.
 

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I'm about 175lbs and my wife is 100lbs soaking wet. We had no problem at all riding together on my old '08 250. I will admit that I could tell I had a passenger as far as power goes but it wasn't too bad. We used the supplied tool and adjusted the pre-load a couple of notches and it helped to feel a little better when hitting bumps in the road. It would be a good idea for anyone to do that if they plan on ever having a passenger. It made the ride much better actually. Other than that, just explain to your passenger that it's important that they lean when you lean and don't move around a lot. I think they should be educated a bit before the ride.
 

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Ya when I took my girl on it there was power but there is no throddle reponse. Also make sure you have PLENTY of room to break. Like roadrunner said make sure u tell your girl to lean with you. Take her to a parking lot or something to show her what it feels like. LOL all my friends ask how to turn and you really cant explain it you just have to do it. I just took my first rider last night on the R6 and it was sooooooo much better. I could hardly tell and cornering was easier throwing more weight around.
 

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I took my wife on a long trip a couple of month back.Although she often ride with me on short trips but never on long once.Haveing a passanger on the back for long time is something you have to get used to.The weight is dif the handling is dif.More shifting to compensate the extra weight.Especially on mountainous road.After a couple of days though it became quiete natural.She let me do the leaning and in the same time she just turn her head in the direction I'm going.She just learn when to lean foward when on gas and backward when breaking.That's good enough.Don't let a passanger fight your driving,especially in turns.You can easily loose control.Brief them before leaving.

 

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I've never had a problem with a passenger. I used to take my ex on it with me, I'm 200 and she's 110, and the bike had no problems moving out with us. I told her to put her helmet on the side of mine that we were leaning (her helmet to the right of mine in a right hand corner), she gripped a bit tighter when on the gas, and leaned back when I was on the brakes. You can't expect the bike to EVER accelerate very well, and that doesn't change if you have a passenger or not. I never adjusted the pre-load of the rear shock and I thought the bike handled very well.

Just give your lady friends a heads up that the leaning position isn't going to feel very good on their sweet spot, and they'll more than likely get off with a massive camel toe. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well once again thanks everyone for some great input. I see that over all it shouldnt be a problem and power is not an issue, as we are only going for low speed cruises in the evenings. Is there a camel toe cushion for the 250...???..LOL
 

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lol, you guys are horrible! :p

Freak, before I ever let a passenger get on the bike, I brief the passenger on these following things, some of which have already been mentioned by other, you might want to give it a try.

1.)Passenger must keep her hands on my hips, if she's holding on to me. No shoulders
2.) Ride where she is comfortable, if that means leaning on my back, cool. If it means sitting up straight like in the picture with Eric and his wife (hot wife by the way Eric!!!), then that's cool too.
3.) She must look over the shoulder I'm turning in. Turning left, she looks over my left shoulder. This helps with the whole "lean with me" idea, just by changing where she's looking.
4.) To love the lean. A lot of passengers freak out with the whole lean thing. I usually take it easy for the first few miles, weaving back and forth in a straight line to get her used to it, then start going around corners faster and faster to lean over farther and farther. If a passenger resists the lean, and grabs a hold of you quickly in the lean, you know she's not adjusted to the whole lean thing. I usually tell her to just go with it - it feels funny at first, but learn to enjoy it, it's what motorcycling is all about - I usually also have to add that I've done this plenty times before, I know what I'm doing, and she will stay safe. She is precious cargo, and there's nothing I will do to endanger her...
5.) Once she's grown to the bike, and the lean, and is comfortable with sitting up straight (I think this is more comfortable for both riders, and looks like both riders know what they're doing to passerby), I tell her to start leaning. On a straight road, I tell her to throw her weight back and forth, and feel what the motorcycle does. At like 35-45mph, as she starts "swaying" back and forth, I then take my hands off the handlebars and point to them. She notices and is (1) surprised to learn how much influence she has over the handling of the motorcycle, (2) that the bike is still going straight even without control over the handlebars, and (3) thoroughly excited about this motorcycling thing.

After step 5, we've usually been riding for about 20 minutes or so, and have approached a sinuous track of mountain road. She's comfortable. I've taken notes about how the motorcycle is different. We can go have a blast and be safe. Before you know it, another hour and a half has passed, you're at the top of the mountian, and she's got a massive smile on her face.

A few other things to do, as some have already mentioned:
Make sure to adjust, and play with the rear suspension to find something you, as pilot, like. If the bike "bounces" too much after a bump, you need to tighten the spring. If you start feeling the rear tire getting light in turns, it's probably because the preload is too tight, and the wheel can't rebound fast enough, so loosen it up a notch or two. I prefer to run "softer" than "harder", because like you said, with a 250, it's not about the crazy speed, but the nice, comfortable, leisurely rides....

Also, make sure to check in with her at every stop light. Teach her that it's best to communicate with the visor up, and show her that you have to turn your head to the side (which means you can't watch the road), to hear her. She will realize it's about the ride, the hanging out with you, is before and after. Make her understand that if she's not comfortable, she needs to speak up, by say, jabbing you in the ribs (you know, a distinct sign, that you can easily distinguish from other signs wandering hands might be giving you :D)

Hope this helps, enjoy, and be safe... :p
 

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Add to that spooph ... get a chatter box.. That thing is awesome for communication with ur pasanger. I love it... specially to tell her "I SMELL BURN RUBBER .I THINK YOUR SHOE IS ON MY EXHAUST" hehe
 

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oh yea, Hi-tech, that's a big thing that I totally spaced, even after reading your post on it... No high-heels, ever... Be careful with other boots, I prefer her to wear high-top sneakers, that way she feels the heat on her heel when she's pushing on the muffler, and can adjust accordingly:D
 

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Haha. By the time she realize that. The heel is melted .. be walking weird after she gets off the bike. "There goes another pair"... here is one.. "Ride on ur socks.. Feel the heat - save a pair of shoes" ;)
 

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this is a really helpful thread :) they told us all of those points spooph on my bike lessons.

Im still in the process of talking my girlfriend into coming on the back but she still says no :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
My girl is pumped to try it, and has all of her gear ready to go. Thanks spooph for yet another detailed and informational reply. Cheers!!!! :) Thanks to everyone else as well Cheers !! :)
 

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No sirens, thats nuts Joe! Where I live, i have to hold my current licence for one year before I can take someone on the back, I think its a good idea to make sure YOU can handle the bike for yourself first before taking someone else's life on board.

Felix







 
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