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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bike is about to hit 8000 miles. Tread and condition of tires are still good (plenty of depth, no tearing or breaking of the rubber). When should I replace them? Should I treat them like car tires? Thanks! :)
 

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How old are they? Look at the production date on the sidewall. It's 4 numbers in an oval, like 2609. The first 2 numbers are the week of manufacture (26th week) the second 2 are the year (2009).

Typically tires start to dry out after 4 years - no matter if they have any tread left or not. A brand new tire that has been stored properly would be the exception. Tread depth on a used tire doesn't really tell you anything.

4 years is plenty for an OEM tire, as they usually aren't that great when new.

I've replaced OEM tires with 500 mi on then because they sucked, and car tires after 3 years because they lost traction. If you haven't worn them out (don't ride until you see wear bars though) in 4 years I recommend new ones for the next season.

Plenty of good choices. I've had Continental SportAttacks and Bridgestone BT-016s (both sport compound) that were sticky and predictable but wear pretty quickly because they are soft.
 

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Bike is about to hit 8000 miles. Tread and condition of tires are still good (plenty of depth, no tearing or breaking of the rubber). When should I replace them? Should I treat them like car tires? Thanks! :)
http://youtu.be/3uk40XrbEl4 Good video explanation of tires. I ride very very aggressively pushing my bikes to the absolute limit on all of them except the zx10 because I haven't quite dialed in the suspension yet. But it only has 6000 miles and I've changed both the front and rear tires twice. I don't expect everyone to be able to spend money on bikes as I do but it's good to get a better idea about the factors of determining tire life
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
How old are they? Look at the production date on the sidewall. It's 4 numbers in an oval, like 2609. The first 2 numbers are the week of manufacture (26th week) the second 2 are the year (2009).

Typically tires start to dry out after 4 years - no matter if they have any tread left or not. A brand new tire that has been stored properly would be the exception. Tread depth on a used tire doesn't really tell you anything.

4 years is plenty for an OEM tire, as they usually aren't that great when new.

I've replaced OEM tires with 500 mi on then because they sucked, and car tires after 3 years because they lost traction. If you haven't worn them out (don't ride until you see wear bars though) in 4 years I recommend new ones for the next season.

Plenty of good choices. I've had Continental SportAttacks and Bridgestone BT-016s (both sport compound) that were sticky and predictable but wear pretty quickly because they are soft.
They came new with the bike in July (bike was new too).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
http://youtu.be/3uk40XrbEl4 Good video explanation of tires. I ride very very aggressively pushing my bikes to the absolute limit on all of them except the zx10 because I haven't quite dialed in the suspension yet. But it only has 6000 miles and I've changed both the front and rear tires twice. I don't expect everyone to be able to spend money on bikes as I do but it's good to get a better idea about the factors of determining tire life
Thanks for the video! I'm commuting during the week ~350 miles total (99% freeway). On the weekend I generally ride more aggressively, in twisties, etc. anywhere from 100 to 300 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How old are they? Look at the production date on the sidewall. It's 4 numbers in an oval, like 2609. The first 2 numbers are the week of manufacture (26th week) the second 2 are the year (2009).

Typically tires start to dry out after 4 years - no matter if they have any tread left or not. A brand new tire that has been stored properly would be the exception. Tread depth on a used tire doesn't really tell you anything.

4 years is plenty for an OEM tire, as they usually aren't that great when new.

I've replaced OEM tires with 500 mi on then because they sucked, and car tires after 3 years because they lost traction. If you haven't worn them out (don't ride until you see wear bars though) in 4 years I recommend new ones for the next season.

Plenty of good choices. I've had Continental SportAttacks and Bridgestone BT-016s (both sport compound) that were sticky and predictable but wear pretty quickly because they are soft.
Oh. And the tires are Dunlop Roadsmart IIs
 

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Oh. And the tires are Dunlop Roadsmart IIs
know nothing of that tire to be honest but I can tell you this. The best tires I have ever used that can be bought have all been Michelin tires. The Dunlop tires are okay but they are not the Michelin tires. I've tried several brands and versions. I have found the Michelin pilot power 2ct's have been the best tire I have put on the bikes. The worst has been the full boar, Bridgestone battalax, shenko, Avon models I used were horrible and great. One was awesome the other the exact opposite.
 
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