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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I got new tires, new front/rear sprockets, and a new chain at the same time. I could've sworn the mechanic told me to keep it under 5,000 rpms for 1000 miles but I can't remember and I've regularly exceeded that number anyway. Does that seem a bit much for the process or what? I have avoided the interstate thus far but it's a bit of an inconvenience. I do hear sometimes a rattling in the chain or something if I go very high with the RPMs, my roommate said that was normal to an extent -- ideas there? I've put a little over 100 miles on the bike since I got it. The turns feel pretty sticky now so I've trusted some fairly sharp angles already and I feel comfortable, but what's this I hear about getting the tires warmed up properly? Should I continue to avoid the interstate?

I have the stop and go down pat, but I'm curious about a few things. One, is it bad if I shift into neutral when I am at a high speed but I'm coming up on a red light for example? I sometimes hear a bit of a "flutter" when I don't raise the clutch sensitively enough into neutral, perhaps trying to catch the second gear instead? Could that be bad for the clutch or anything? Two, is it more useful to downshift to a stop than the above method? I mean, if I have time and space is it better for the bike? Also, any words of advice for having a passenger with so little experience? I will have a friend in town next week or afterwards and I'm wondering how much of a different game it is, if anyone thinks I'm somehow going to depreciate in skill so drastically as for it to be dangerous with an additional ~100 lbs on the back of the bike. Keep in mind, this is after my first week of riding in public. :popcorn: I trusted one of my roommates to cart me around when he had only had his bike for a month or two, and he gave me many rides since with no problem.
 

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As for all the other stuff about tires and sprockets I always just rip it from putting them on till they are dead. LOL. But, as for riding two up, it is really up to you. If you feel uncomfortable giving other people a ride you prolly shouldnt. I didnt give anyone any rides until I was comfortable that I could do it cuz wrecking by myself is one thing, but wrecking with someone else is another. Plus esp on the 250, the extra weight really bogs down the lil guy so you gotta get used to slower accelerationa and teaching the passenger how to lean with you into turns and stuff. But thats just my 5 cents...
 

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New tires, sprocket, and chain - how does engine RPMs relate to that? Carefully scuffing-in new tires is a good idea, but that's done a little at a time in the corners.

Have you adjusted the chain? It is probably too loose by now and is making the noise. Checked the tire pressure? You should be doing that regularly - like at least once a week. Checked the oil? Brake fluid quality (should be perfectly clear) and levels good? There are a lot of maintenance items with a cycle that can easily cause you to go down if not addressed regularly.

Don't shift into neutral at high speeds. You should shift down as your speeds drop, keeping the RPMs in a range where you can accelerate smoothly if needed. The flutter noise is most likely the gears being half-meshed - not good.

Do not ride with a passenger! You need more time to work out the mechanics of riding before adding the additional variables.

Have you taken a MSF or similar riding course? If not, sign-up tomorrow.

You have too many questions that need to be answered, and need some hand-on instruction to be safe out there.


Jay
 

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I know it sounds kinda dramatic, but the way I think of it is, killing yourself is one thing, but killing someone else??? I dont think I could live with that so I waited till I was good and ready to give people rides.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
@Jay correct me if I'm wrong but the chain is distributing those RPMs to the tires is it not? I can see a relation, not being a smartass either. I'm just trying to figure out if it's truly necessary for me to still avoid the interstate. :ermm:

The chain was adjusted by the mechanic, I can see it gives about an inch or so in either direction which seems okay from what I've read, it was too loose before I got it changed. I checked the pressure tonight for the first time this week, I got about 28-30 on the back tire and 30 on the front. Those cheap little tire gauges aren't worth a @#%*@! Different number every time it seems. But I think the numbers I got were accurate, I tested several times. I need an oil change which I will take care of when I got some more cash, and by appearances my rear brake fluid is running low while the front is fine.

I don't think I'm unsafe on the road if that's what you're saying, but I'm not gonna argue that I could use a lot more instruction and questions answered. :facepalm:
 

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The speed of the chain has nothing to do with the speed of the engine - you can be going 30 MPH at 10,000 RPMs or 30 MPH at 2,000 RPMs - the chain is spinning the same speed either way. There's no reason that you need to keep the RPMs down when you have a new chain. That doesn't make any sense. A new chain will usually need adjustment shortly after installation, even if it's set properly when you ride out the door. You need to be able to check and set it to the proper tension yourself.

You need to be able to do all the basic maintenance items accurately yourself. Get the tools you need. Know what the tire pressures should be, and have an accurate gage. This is important stuff that your safety depends on.

I'm not saying you are unsafe, just that you have questions that need good answers. There's too much going on when you are riding in traffic - that's no time to be working on teaching yourself the basics.

Take a MSF course. It will teach you the proper techniques you need to ride safely.

I'm not trying to sound harsh or rip on you in any way. I just feel that you need some hands-on help learning more about riding and owning a cycle. The consequences are just too high not to.


Jay
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I meant to say I have taken the MSF course already, that is the only reason I could afford the gear I got because it provided a 15% discount at the place I was at, one-time only but on a $400 purchase it made a huge difference.

I see why you asked about the chain now, and I would like to buy an accurate gauge for sure. If I give the impression I don't know much it's just because I'd rather ask too many questions than not enough. I performed very well at the MSF course and I only missed 1 question on the written test, but that wasn't difficult at all to be honest. It's just the reality that when I'm on my own and have time to ride I'm going to come up with more questions than I could have before I walked into that place, you know? But no worries I know you're just trying to help. Thanks again. :thumb:
 

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Search here too, you'll find chain adjusting/lube. Also How To on your oil change. The oil change is pretty cheap to do on your own, that way you won't have to wait and save up much money to pay for it.

I'm not very mechanical, the oil change and air filter cleaning was the first wrenching I ever did on the Ninja. It was a great time, makes you appreciate the bike even more. Like a bonding experience. And it really is easy with just a few basic tools. Make sure you have a means of disposing of the oil properly.
 

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VCD - on your rear fluid being low - BEFORE topping off the fluid, check your rear brake pads - I'm willing to bet they're just about toast... and if you scrape metal and metal, expect to pay A LOT more for a rotor in addition to replacement pads....

NEXT.... if you're shooting through a set of rear brakes BEFORE your fronts, you're not being aggressive enough with your front brake. Trust me when I tell you you can brake SUPER hard on the 250.... As long as you keep your weight back, you won't flip over the front of the bike. I'd recommend practicing hard braking using just the front brake in a parking lot from various speeds (up to say 50mph).... I tell you this, because I typically go through 5 or 6 sets of front brake pads for every 1 rear.... When I first got the bike, I was going through 2 sets of rear pads for every 1 one, and the guys at the shop set me straight.... I rarely EVER use my rear brake anymore...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
@spooph when I bought the bike the previous owner advised me to replace the rear brake pads so I did so when I had a mechanic replace the tires, sprocket, and chain. While there, I only had enough to replace the rear pads but he advised me I would need to replace the front pads sometime soon as well. I did hear about the braking ratio though and while I felt myself using the rear brake a lot in the beginning that was before that advice so I've since stopped using it except for sudden stops when I really need the power of both. As is I can feel there should be more "oomph" to the front brakes if they're truly ~80% of my stopping power, so hopefully as early as this weekend I can get some new pads.

I've been on the highway several times now, I see what people mean about the wind knocking them around. More riding has seemingly showed me that ~4k RPMs seems to be a sweet spot for shifting. Any comments on that idea? Can't wait until I have the satisfaction that everything is in order, but I won't forget routine maintenance. It does feel good to treat it with a little TLC.
 

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I'm glad Spoof mentioned the front brake issue. You can use both brakes, but when serious braking is needed it's the front that's hauling it down. A locked rear is more of a distraction than a real help IMO. Modulating the rear so it won't lock is a waste of time. You only have so much mental energy to use in an emergency situation. Concentrate all of your mental energy and focus your skills on modulating (not locking) the front - it's what is going to save you from hitting what's in front of you.

Shifting at 4000 RPMs isn't what you need to do for any serious acceleration with the Ninja, or most any small engine. The Ninja's peak power is up around 10,000 RPMs, so that's where you need to be if you want to get moving. 7,000 or 8,000 would be fine for moderate acceleration, 5,000 to 6,000 would be about as low as I'd expect any amount of acceleration.

If you can get Vesrah RJL brake pads for the Ninja, I would.


Jay
 

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As Jkv mentioned about power band, I tend to keep the ninja right around 9K for acceleration, and sometimes all the way up to redline. My ninja only sees 4K and below when we're stopped or in a neighborhood/apartment complex....

But do what you feels right to you.

Also, glad to hear about the brake pads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I'm able to look for front brake pads now and I'm curious if anyone has recommendations? What's the limit you'd pay and is there one brand you'd pick before any other? Can't wait to change the oil, too. Turns out a security guard at my school is a bit of an enthusiast and I think between him and my roommates we can save a lot of money on some small repairs and maintenance we need. My friend's clutch cable is all but de-threaded and he's been riding around still. :eek:
 

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I'm able to look for front brake pads now and I'm curious if anyone has recommendations? What's the limit you'd pay and is there one brand you'd pick before any other? Can't wait to change the oil, too. Turns out a security guard at my school is a bit of an enthusiast and I think between him and my roommates we can save a lot of money on some small repairs and maintenance we need. My friend's clutch cable is all but de-threaded and he's been riding around still. :eek:
Last sentence in my last post.


Jay
 

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EBC stock replacements. Not sure if you can feel the benefit of HH pads yet, and I'm a bit disappointed in mine, they don't really provide the feel I want, but do stop the bike in a jiffy...
Try some Vesrah RJLs next time around spooph. Street riders to racers all seem to agree they give excellent feel and stopping power.


Jay
 
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