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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I finally got my new bike today from sunrise motorcycles in Va today! It is a 2012 Kawasaki Ninja ex250 SE. I love it! I rode it back home (about a 45 min trip). This was my first time riding since my MSF BRC. It was also my first time riding a ninja. I was a little nervous because the trip back included going on the interstate and going past third gear and riding on an actual road. All of these things were a first for me. No sooner had I gotten gas that a really bad thunderstorm came through. It was a wild ride but a lot of fun and I got a lot more confidence in myself with riding my bike. I only really messed up once, one of the last turns before I got home I did not turn sharp enough and I almost hit the curb. before I did, I hit the brakes hard and my no-no spot hit the gas tank pretty hard:facepalm: . It hurt a lot lol but i learned from it at least. All in all I am really loving this bike!
 

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Congrats!

One tip - don't grab a handful of brake if you feel you can't make a turn.

Get in the habit of leaning over more than you feel comfortable with if you need to tighten your line or have come into a corner faster than you expected. It's a much better option than going straight off a corner or grabbing the brakes.

9 times out of 10 you have more lean available than you think.

For this to work for you you need to have good fresh tires and have them set to the proper pressure - which is something you should check about every week anyway along with chain tension, oil level, and other simple but important routine checks.

You are much more dependent on the proper operation of a cycle than a car to keep yourself safe out on the streets.


Jay
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Congrats!

One tip - don't grab a handful of brake if you feel you can't make a turn.

Get in the habit of leaning over more than you feel comfortable with if you need to tighten your line or have come into a corner faster than you expected. It's a much better option than going straight off a corner or grabbing the brakes.

9 times out of 10 you have more lean available than you think.

For this to work for you you need to have good fresh tires and have them set to the proper pressure - which is something you should check about every week anyway along with chain tension, oil level, and other simple but important routine checks.

You are much more dependent on the proper operation of a cycle than a car to keep yourself safe out on the streets.


Jay
Thank you, i actually used you're tip with the brakes, and it worked. It feels pretty good to take some of those tight turns. I rode 4 and a half hours today to get to work for the week, and it was awesome. i stopped every hour to stretch my legs because after a while that seat gets uncomfortable, but I'm sure I'll get used to it.
 

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Thank you, i actually used you're tip with the brakes, and it worked. It feels pretty good to take some of those tight turns. I rode 4 and a half hours today to get to work for the week, and it was awesome. i stopped every hour to stretch my legs because after a while that seat gets uncomfortable, but I'm sure I'll get used to it.
You're welcome.

One more tip that they won't teach you in the MSF course - concentrate on the front brake for 90% of your braking. I know they tell you to use both brakes evenly to stop, which is just fine when you are coming to a controlled stop at a controlled pace, but when the s*** hits the fan and you need to haul it down right now it doesn't work as you are accustomed to. The much larger amount of weight transfer from an emergency stop unloads the rear suspension and weights the front wheel completely differently than during a normal stop. Using 2 fingers on the lever will give you enough strength to really crank on it but also limit to a certain extent the force you can put on the lever. Always be sure to quickly but smoothly apply the brake in those situations. You can't afford the time to slowly apply the brake, but you can't just grab it and yank it to the bar either or you'll lock the wheel.

What happens when you are surprised or under stress is you will lose a good amount of your fine motor ability, and trying to modulate the rear brake with your foot in those situations is really tough. The wheel will lock, which isn't a super big problem unless it starts to move to the side. If you release it when it's stepped out it will snap back into alignment and upset the cycle and compound your problems. If you are really using the front to its full potential the rear will be almost off the ground anyway.

The bigger problem with a locked rear wheel - IMO - is the amount of distraction it creates. It divides your concentration and draws your focus away from the most important end (front). In those situations you can't afford it. Be aware that in many situations swerving to avoid the obstacle, instead of trying to stop short of it, may be a better choice.

When you hear "had to lay 'er down.." what they are really saying is "I jumped hard on the rear brake, locked it, and turned away..."

Go to a clean open parking lot and practice with the front brake. You should hear scuffing and maybe a little squealing from the front tire if you are at the point of maximum traction - but be careful and work up to it slowly. You don't have to get to that point in one practice session.

Keep your emergency stopping simple, and focus all of your concentration on the single most important aspect - modulating the front brake.


Jay
 

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jkv45 said:
You're welcome.

One more tip that they won't teach you in the MSF course - concentrate on the front brake for 90% of your braking. I know they tell you to use both brakes evenly to stop, which is just fine when you are coming to a controlled stop at a controlled pace, but when the s*** hits the fan and you need to haul it down right now it doesn't work as you are accustomed to. The much larger amount of weight transfer from an emergency stop unloads the rear suspension and weights the front wheel completely differently than during a normal stop. Using 2 fingers on the lever will give you enough strength to really crank on it but also limit to a certain extent the force you can put on the lever. Always be sure to quickly but smoothly apply the brake in those situations. You can't afford the time to slowly apply the brake, but you can't just grab it and yank it to the bar either or you'll lock the wheel.

What happens when you are surprised or under stress is you will lose a good amount of your fine motor ability, and trying to modulate the rear brake with your foot in those situations is really tough. The wheel will lock, which isn't a super big problem unless it starts to move to the side. If you release it when it's stepped out it will snap back into alignment and upset the cycle and compound your problems. If you are really using the front to its full potential the rear will be almost off the ground anyway.

The bigger problem with a locked rear wheel - IMO - is the amount of distraction it creates. It divides your concentration and draws your focus away from the most important end (front). In those situations you can't afford it. Be aware that in many situations swerving to avoid the obstacle, instead of trying to stop short of it, may be a better choice.

When you hear "had to lay 'er down.." what they are really saying is "I jumped hard on the rear brake, locked it, and turned away..."

Go to a clean open parking lot and practice with the front brake. You should hear scuffing and maybe a little squealing from the front tire if you are at the point of maximum traction - but be careful and work up to it slowly. You don't have to get to that point in one practice session.

Keep your emergency stopping simple, and focus all of your concentration on the single most important aspect - modulating the front brake.

Jay
Congrats enjoy!!
 

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If I feel I'm not making the turn and it isn't bad, I drag the rear brake, if it's bad, I lean more. My biggest thing I figured out several weeks into ownership was to let off the throttle when shifting, made things 100% smoother.
 

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If I feel I'm not making the turn and it isn't bad, I drag the rear brake, if it's bad, I lean more. My biggest thing I figured out several weeks into ownership was to let off the throttle when shifting, made things 100% smoother.
What if you figure out late that it is indeed worse than you thought? Will you apply more rear brake? I wouldn't...

Applying a brake mid-turn can create all sorts of problems.

Just lean - forget applying the rear brake.

Keep it simple.
 
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