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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Evening all,

After waiting, searching, going back and forth, waiting some more, going back and :facepalm:...you get the idea. I finally stopped feeling guilty & took the plunge. 2007 Ninja 250. 1k miles, 1 owner, not a single scratch on her and the break-in plastic/instructions still on the tach. Still have to complete my safety course but after working my butt off to get through college, I'm using the remaning cheek to wear a groove in the seat of my new bike :thumb:

Tire Wheel Fuel tank Vehicle Automotive fuel system
 

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Welcome mate, good to have you here!
That is one well looked after bike, and I can't believe it only has 1000 miles on it!!
Nice find.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks a lot comrades. I'm still in disbelief about the whole idea, but the kid in me was aching to come out. Been a long time since I've had any time to enjoy myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Holy crap!

Welcome, and that is one CLEAN 4 year old bike!

Felix
Thanks a lot and I look forward to learning a great deal from the forum members as I get rolling in the near future. Believe or not the tires still have the rubber "utters" on the sides! Now it's just a matter of getting it on the trailer & in the garage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks BlackBoar & yes team black is in the building. Just picked her up yesterday evening & she's resting comfortably in the garage. Now if I could only get into a rider's course before the end of next month.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks spooph & welcome prpldude-just got her home Monday and had my 1st stall trying to get out of the garage this evening...thus is the reason I'm taking a rider course within the next few weeks. Finding the friction zone wasn't too bad, but I got impatient and tried to force her out of 1st gear instead of using a little throttle/clutch finesse. At least I was the only one outside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Update...
Took my very first ride today after getting home from work & putting some gas in my bike. Started her up, let her idle in the driveway for about 3 minutes, threw my gear on & tried again...Went from neutral down to 1st & patiently let out the clutch while giving her some gas-Houston we have duck paddle! Rode up & down the block a few times...stalled twice in the driveway though. What can I say-I'm a noob & I've never driven a manual until today. :)
 

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Don't worry too much about it, it happens to everyone! On our old CBR125, you could not feel the take-up point, and you could stall it 4-5 times at the lights!!

Keep practicing, and just enjoy yourself!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Don't worry too much about it, it happens to everyone! On our old CBR125, you could not feel the take-up point, and you could stall it 4-5 times at the lights!!

Keep practicing, and just enjoy yourself!
Thanks Zandit I just laughed because each time it happened I was pulling in the driveway & hadn't shifted back into neutral from 1st:facepalm:. I need a wide open lot like the size of an abandoned arena to shift up & down, turn, stop, etc. Oh well my rider course is in 4 weeks-I think I can wait. :angel:
 

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Update...
Took my very first ride today after getting home from work & putting some gas in my bike. Started her up, let her idle in the driveway for about 3 minutes, threw my gear on & tried again...Went from neutral down to 1st & patiently let out the clutch while giving her some gas-Houston we have duck paddle! Rode up & down the block a few times...stalled twice in the driveway though. What can I say-I'm a noob & I've never driven a manual until today. :)
Keep this in mind, and they will tell you this in the MSF course as well... Most motorcycles, including the 250 have a wet-multi-plate clutch, which means it can handle a lot more abuse than a car's single plate, dry clutch.... This means you can slip it a lot more. So essentially, you shouldn't feel like your hurting the bike when you let the clutch out to the friction point and then pause. While you gradually increase engine rpm with the throttle, respectively let out the clutch until it's all the way out. Like, when I ride, I let out the clutch the majority of the range until I feel it engage, and then add throttle and let the clutch out the same amounts. If you want a faster pull-out, add more throttle than clutch - letting the clutch slip more. If you want to get going slower, add less throttle than clutch.... I hope this makes sense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Okay I got you Spooph! Instead of having "great" timing, bikes allow people like me to learn to handle manual shifting without doing major damage in the beginning. I'm sure that as my comfort level grows, my takeoff & shifting will naturally improve.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Practiced a bit more up and down the street today, making u-turns and shifting. Spooph you were right. I realized that my stalls came from a natural fear of the bikes takeoff. I kept stalling at the bottom of the hill until I realized that the bike wants to go & needs gas to do so (seems so simple...why didn't I think of that). Either way, after about 10 passes, no stalls and I was comfortably pulling off, shifting & turning around in 1st gear without stalling or bucking the bike. Thanks a million Spooph!
 
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