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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took my MTC well over a year ago and finally actually got a bike back in december, so i don't remember all of the techniques taught in the course; the biggest of which, shifting/clutch use

The biggest problem that i run into when shifting gears, is preparing for a turn. I'm always concerned about shifting into a false neutral (or actual neutral.. heh.. it happens to everyone) when i'm ready to turn. I typically engage the clutch halfway through the turn. Is this the correct way to go about it? I have a mean turn-in that i have to use to get to my home, and it makes me so nervous every time i make it because i'm afraid that i could end up falling over or something.

What are some useful clutch-work tips in general for motorcycle noobs?

oh.. and are you supposed to give the bike revs when it's in the friction zone? or after it's fully engaged. I DO remember that the friction zone is extremely useful at low speeds doing u-turns and such, but i'm curious how i can reduce any wear and tear on the transmission/clutch
 

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Good one....?
I never took a course, but have been biking for 40+ years...
I always just power threw a corner.
Sharp corner or not....
Not saying give it hell, but.....
A bit of power keeps u in control.
I'm driving a Ninja 650..nnn......
Always keep my rpms above 3000.......
Keeps me in a rpm range high enough to at least apply power n not stall.
Anyone else help out this peoples?

:thumb::thumb::thumb::thumb::dance::dance:








 

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From what you describe, it sounds like you are doing the right technique for slow speed turns. You just have to make sure you are in the right gear. Remember to always set up your downshift prior to a turn, light throttle when leaned over (depending on the type turn), roll on the throttle as you exit the curve/turn and straighten up.

Rev match aka-"blip" the throttle when downshifting with the clutch completely disengaged. Sometimes if the tranny will not come out of gear (i.e. after a panic stop) it may be necessary to lightly rev the engine while just inside the friction zone. This helps to un-mesh the gears. This will take a little time to master. Once you have it it will become 2nd nature.

To help minimize transmission wear, make sure your shifts are as smooth as possible, use the clutch and ensure it is properly adjusted, make sure you have the proper oil level and that you chain is properly lubed and adjusted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
From what you describe, it sounds like you are doing the right technique for slow speed turns. You just have to make sure you are in the right gear. Remember to always set up your downshift prior to a turn, light throttle when leaned over (depending on the type turn), roll on the throttle as you exit the curve/turn and straighten up.

Rev match aka-"blip" the throttle when downshifting with the clutch completely disengaged. Sometimes if the tranny will not come out of gear (i.e. after a panic stop) it may be necessary to lightly rev the engine while just inside the friction zone. This helps to un-mesh the gears. This will take a little time to master. Once you have it it will become 2nd nature.

To help minimize transmission wear, make sure your shifts are as smooth as possible, use the clutch and ensure it is properly adjusted, make sure you have the proper oil level and that you chain is properly lubed and adjusted.
so you're saying that the clutch IS supposed to be DISENGAGED when i enter a lower speed turn?

the particular turn i'm referring to has me coming off a 45 mph road into a residential area with a large uphill entrance, so i'm in a bit of a hurry to get off the road and not get rear ended. I'll try the blipping the throttle thing on my way home here shortly... that lurch that i get when engaging the clutch is part of the reason that the turn worries me
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
How low a speed u talking?
about about 10 MPH.. 2nd gear. i have to slow down pretty quick seeing as how people like to go 50-55 MPH down this particular street... the turn in is about 50 feet away from a dangerous intersection where wrecks are common. a biker died there 4-5 years ago, but that was probably because he was being stupid.. he and his bike flew through a 2-3 foot thick stone wall (i'm not exaggerating) about 20 feet away from the curb
 

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Myself...... I'd be in whatever gear that would keep my rpms ( depending on ur bike) at that will give me the power to ether slow some if needed or hit the hole i need to get into.
I'd probably make that 5 grand on my 650. I could let off n slow no problems or punch it n hit that hole to get into traffic. But....... That's how i drive, and can't say it would be right for you not knowing ur experience.
I've been told i drive a bit like a nut at times......LOL...
P.S. I don't use my clutch much....
just to start off n stop....
I guess they call it speed shifting??
I bet a lot of the other drivers drive this way too.....

:whistling::whistling::whistling:








 

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so you're saying that the clutch IS supposed to be DISENGAGED when i enter a lower speed turn?
No. Remember to always set up your downshift prior to a turn. If you have to slow down/brake for the turn, you can down shift prior without blipping and be in gear while in a turn/curve.

It is possible to coast (clutch disengaged) through a very low speed turn (like you described). You just need to have enough speed to carry you through the turn and be prepared to let the clutch out in the right gear and roll on the throttle once through the turn. If you are lurching when letting out the clutch, your gear may be a little low for the speed traveled.

Don't be afraid of cars not stopping or slowing down while you set up to turn. You have a right to the road just as much as they have and they need to be better drivers and recognize a vehicle that is slowing or turning. Most importantly, make sure they see you. Make yourself more visible (i.e. hi-viz gear, brake light modulator, auxiliary brake lights).

Being confident in yourself and your bike is the key to being a good, safe rider. Being over or under confident can be a problem and can cause you to make mistakes.

Consistently practicing your skills and improving yourself as a rider can help you in knowing the dynamics, effects, mechanics and limits of you and your bike. Practice in order to get good, or better, at what is difficult for you - to become skillful - or to CONFIRM that you remain skillful. Practice increases confidence. Confidence shows as 'skill.'
 

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Get in the right gear before the corner so you and your bike are settled ....makes for a smoother ride ,try and get your braking done in as straight a line as possible,you can trail a small amount of front into the corner if you feel you're still going too fast !
 

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Last year was my first year on a bike, corners scared the crap out of me. But once you get more time on the bike and become more comfortable each corner gets easier. After awhile it becomes " somewhat" instinctive,but don't get to cocky or you'll end up on your ass. IMO
 

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my driving test, many moons ago...
i can still hear the inspector screaming "if you disengage the clutch when going around a corner... i am out of here!"

i kind of like earlthepearl's recommendation... have enough rpm's when entering the curve
this allows you to control your bike quite effectively with the throttle
 
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