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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my bike for almost 2 years now and I have a little under 8000 miles on it.
The other day I was looking over my bike and I noticed something odd about my rear brake pads. They wore off significantly and unevenly in comparison to my front brake. Does anyone know what could have caused this?
I use both brakes when I stop and I've never done anything extreme or out of the ordinary with my bike.

I was thinking about replacing the brake pads and brake fluid myself. I was looking through my service manual and found some "how to" videos on youtube. The brake pads look pretty straightforward, but I'm unsure about how to bleed the brakes correctly. My service manual gives me one way, while youtube and other fellow riders give me another way. I just want to make sure I do it right...I mean brakes are pretty important.
Anyone have any tips or advice? I really appreciate any help you can give =)
 

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I would say follow youtube videos, usually the guide gives you correct ways but lamer ways haha, so go and look for a youtube video with 50+ rates and 4.5-5 stars. :D
Hope I helped.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the heads up.
I actually found that write up on the brake pads before I posted the topic. I figured I would follow his write up for the front brake pad.
However, will the rear be any different? Or is the process the same??

Also, does anyone have any advice on how to bleed the brakes?
 

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the pads used on the front and rear brakes are the same, so compressing the calipers and putting the new pads in is exactly the same. THere are also 2 bolts holding the rear caliper on, they're harder to get to, and I think they're hex heads, not regular bolt heads. They're a bit of a pain to get to, but it's fairly easy to get the rear caliper off...

Concerning advice on bleeding the brakes - 1.) take your time and be patient. Do you know how to bleed the brakes, and/or is there a video on youtube how to do it? If no on both accounts, I could do one...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks spooph.

I think I'll try changing the brake pads myself. It's always nice to save some money when you can do it yourself.

In regards to bleeding the brakes, I'm not 100% positive on how to do it. I've seen videos about it on youtube, and my service manual gives instructions on how to do it. But the videos on youtube and the instructions in my service manual are a bit different.
It would be great if you could do a write up/video on it! Your write ups are really helpful and detailed =)
 

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+2!!!!

You're it Spooph!!
 

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Right oh, I'll do it over the weekend. Or rather, I'll try my best... Things are a little crazy right now.

So let me give you this in the interim: When bleeding the brakes it's best to have the bike level - on the rear stand or the like. If you don't have this option, just make sure to keep the brake reservoirs in mind - brake fluid eats paint, your hands, and most everything else it comes in contact with. Have patience, bubbles don't pop with hastyness.. :p

This is for both front and rear -
1.) open the reservoir, check fluid level.
2.) Locate your bleeder valve (I believe it's a size 10mm wrench).
3.) Hook a bleed line to your bleeder valve.
4.)barely crack the bleeder vavle
5.) Compress the line by squeezing the brake lever SLOWLY - you'll see fluid start to run down the bleed line.
6.) Close the bleed valve - you don't have to crank on it.
7.) Let the brake lever/pedal back out, and watch a little bit of fluid get sucked out of the reservoir.
8.) repeat step 4 - 8 until there are no more bubbles, no matter how small they are, comming out of the line.

Notes:
- Make sure to keep the reservoir topped off so you don't suck air down the lines.
- If you keep getting bubbles, close the bleed valve tightly, and pump the brakes slowly, with force to force the smaller bubbles to become larger bubbles. Then let it sit for about 10 min, and then try bleeding them again.
- If you pump the brakes fast and hard while the reservoir is open, brake fluid will jump out of it and onto your bike. It's also a good idea to cover your tank and rear wheel when doing this, to catch any fluid that might drip...
- Make sure t use DOT4 fluid, not the Dot3 you buy at Wallmart... Any DOT4 will work, it doesn't have to be motorcycle specific.

I'm going to take pictures over the weekend of how to do this, and will post them back here, and as their own "How To" when I get a chance next - hopefully this weekend.

Good luck for now! :D
 

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I think I counted about 8 different personalities there!!!!
At least you can keep them all going in the same direction Spooph!!! Well Done!
 

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Spooph,you're good.It's just worth listening to your,eh,sound?Haha.

One thing in mind.Break fluid do desolve very well in water.So when bleeding your breaks,do have a bucket full of water nearby.Should you spill break fluid on the paint,don't wipe it off with a rag.It makes the matter worst.Just pure some whater over the spillage.This will immediately wash off the break fluit off the paint.
 

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spooph said:
oh, cool, I didn't know that.. I'll remember that one!
That's the reason why the factory recommend changing the break fluid every year.It collects moisture from the air.
Spooph,just try dripping some drop of B-fluid into a glass of water and see how it turn whitish.
 
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