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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey ladies & gents I have another problem on my hands..

Basically I just got this 2000 Kawasaki Ninja 250 and it keeps dying on me. I just bought a new battery and it drained on me after a few 10minute sessions of riding. So I brought the battery back to the store because it was low testing at 6-8v. When I got the new battery they went ahead and trickle charged it for me before use for about 5 hours. When I picked it up after the trickle charge I immediately tested it. It was reading a little under 13v and at 10v when low tested, which was GREAT! After one session it dropped to 12v, 9v low, then 11v & once again 8v low and declining... I'm just taking a guess here and saying my alternator is bad since every time after I ride the battery goes down a volt or so. It got to the point on my last battery that it was making the low battery noise and vibrating the 30A fuse box. I got stranded and had to kick start myself yesterday.

This is my first bike so any help is appreciated! :angel:

Thank you in advance,
Ryan
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

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Could this be an alternator issue?
I highly doubt it. They are usually pretty reliable.
The stator make AC power, the regulator rectifies the alternating current into DC, and regulates it down to a maximum of about 14.7 volts DC. The reason the AC must be converted to DC is because you can't store AC voltage in a battery, only DC.The reason you battery is dieng so fast is because 1.) it's not being charged 2.) the bike is running off the battery.

The regulator is plug and play. Replacing the stator is an engine breakdown. Your choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I highly doubt it. They are usually pretty reliable.
The stator make AC power, the regulator rectifies the alternating current into DC, and regulates it down to a maximum of about 14.7 volts DC. The reason the AC must be converted to DC is because you can't store AC voltage in a battery, only DC.The reason you battery is dieng so fast is because 1.) it's not being charged 2.) the bike is running off the battery.

The regulator is plug and play. Replacing the stator is an engine breakdown. Your choice.
I'm definitely going to take your expert advise and replace the regulator ;) I really appreciate the help man, this has been driving me nuts the past couple days.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I highly doubt it. They are usually pretty reliable.
The stator make AC power, the regulator rectifies the alternating current into DC, and regulates it down to a maximum of about 14.7 volts DC. The reason the AC must be converted to DC is because you can't store AC voltage in a battery, only DC.The reason you battery is dieng so fast is because 1.) it's not being charged 2.) the bike is running off the battery.

The regulator is plug and play. Replacing the stator is an engine breakdown. Your choice.
So I couldn't wait and I went out in the garage, took off the fairing and got to the regulator. I made sure the connection was secure and emergency charged my battery up to get back to 12v 10v low. It didn't work as expected but I just so happen to have gotten an extra regulator I pulled out of extra parts I got with the bike. So I went ahead and plugged in the new regulator and I had the same problem, still draining. It could be that both are bad but is there a way of telling? Both of them heated up after use. Also could I test the battery while it's on and see if it's putting out around 14v? Thanks again
 

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So I couldn't wait and I went out in the garage, took off the fairing and got to the regulator. I made sure the connection was secure and emergency charged my battery up to get back to 12v 10v low. It didn't work as expected but I just so happen to have gotten an extra regulator I pulled out of extra parts I got with the bike. So I went ahead and plugged in the new regulator and I had the same problem, still draining. It could be that both are bad but is there a way of telling? Both of them heated up after use. Also could I test the battery while it's on and see if it's putting out around 14v? Thanks again
Not sure what you were expecting, but you are going to need a multimeter to check to see if the charging system is charging properly and if the regulator works or is defective. The manuals outline the test procedures.

- for all practical purposes if the battery is below 12.2 volts, it’s dead.
- the ideal voltage should be more like 12.6-12.8 volts after the bike has been sitting a few days and also at idle.
- note the voltage readings at various engine speeds with the headlight turned on and then turned off. (To turn off the headlight, disconnect the headlight connector in the upper fairing.) The readings should show nearly battery voltage when the engine speed is low, and, as the engine speed rises, the readings should also rise. But they must be kept under 15 volts.
-if the charging voltage is kept between the 14-15 volts, the charging system is considered to be working normally.
-if the charging voltage is much higher than 15 volts, the regulator/rectifier is defective or the regulator/rectifier leads are loose or open.
-if the charging voltage does not rise as the engine speed increases, then the regulator/rectifier is defective or the alternator output is insufficient for the loads. Check the alternator and regulator/rectifier to determine which part is defective.
- unless the bike has suffered some kind of major damage that may affect the electrical charging system, your battery will more than likely be the culprit for not meeting minimum specifications
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Not sure what you were expecting, but you are going to need a multimeter to check to see if the charging system is charging properly and if the regulator works or is defective. The manuals outline the test procedures.

- for all practical purposes if the battery is below 12.2 volts, it’s dead.
- the ideal voltage should be more like 12.6-12.8 volts after the bike has been sitting a few days and also at idle.
- note the voltage readings at various engine speeds with the headlight turned on and then turned off. (To turn off the headlight, disconnect the headlight connector in the upper fairing.) The readings should show nearly battery voltage when the engine speed is low, and, as the engine speed rises, the readings should also rise. But they must be kept under 15 volts.
-if the charging voltage is kept between the 14-15 volts, the charging system is considered to be working normally.
-if the charging voltage is much higher than 15 volts, the regulator/rectifier is defective or the regulator/rectifier leads are loose or open.
-if the charging voltage does not rise as the engine speed increases, then the regulator/rectifier is defective or the alternator output is insufficient for the loads. Check the alternator and regulator/rectifier to determine which part is defective.
- unless the bike has suffered some kind of major damage that may affect the electrical charging system, your battery will more than likely be the culprit for not meeting minimum specifications
Once again thank you so very much! I will be troubleshooting this when I get off. Will post any results :thumb:
 

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You can do the above steps or you can also check the system by placing the voltmeter probes on the battery wires @ the terminals. This will tell you if the battery is being charged correctly.

Here are some classic symptoms of battery failure. Also note if any of these are present if;


  • Gauges on (neutral, oil and temp) but the starter won't catch
  • Tach starts bouncing, and then the engine starts to act like it's out of gas.
  • Engine keeps coughing, but tach is much higher than it should be, or it is bouncing wildly from low to high.
  • Engine surges with turn signal on.
  • When trying to start, you hear a click and all the lights go dead.
  • You try to start and you hear clickclickclickclickclick - The clicks can come so fast they sound like a robot cat purring.
Also check all of your connections to make sure they are secure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You can do the above steps or you can also check the system by placing the voltmeter probes on the battery wires @ the terminals. This will tell you if the battery is being charged correctly.

Here are some classic symptoms of battery failure. Also note if any of these are present if;


  • Gauges on (neutral, oil and temp) but the starter won't catch
  • Tach starts bouncing, and then the engine starts to act like it's out of gas.
  • Engine keeps coughing, but tach is much higher than it should be, or it is bouncing wildly from low to high.
  • Engine surges with turn signal on.
  • When trying to start, you hear a click and all the lights go dead.
  • You try to start and you hear clickclickclickclickclick - The clicks can come so fast they sound like a robot cat purring.
Also check all of your connections to make sure they are secure.

Yeah, I did that before doing any of the troubleshooting and it wasn't getting going up past the charged 12.8v. So I tested the regulator, it is working fine, both of them. Just tested the 3 yellow wires that come from the alternator and they all were around 56 at 4000RPM with a 200 AC multimeter test. This multimeter doesn't have the resistance test so I need to go grab another multimeter but now it seems like the stator is testing good and so is the regulator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Oh didn't see those wiring schematics on my phone. Thanks! I got something interesting I tested. When the headlight is connected it runs like it did before, start up 12.8v and doesn't go up when revving, goes down so no power is getting there. But when I disconnect the headlight the battery will slowly get up, I got it to 13.5v a minute ago from 12.8v on startup, prob around 4000rpm. So basically what I'm concluding from this is that my charging system is working since it charged the battery more... correct? Could the headlight be sucking up more power than necessary?
 

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.... So basically what I'm concluding from this is that my charging system is working since it charged the battery more... correct? Could the headlight be sucking up more power than necessary?
Yes, it appears the charging system is working.

Even though your battery may be new, I'd replace it just to be sure it is not the culprit. It is possible to have a dead cell or two and still have 12+ volts, this can happen with some cheaper batteries.

A low battery/electrical charge will present itself with ever-decreasing lights and power, backfiring as the plugs start to fail to ignite all the time, and eventual deadness.

Also double check the wattage on your headlight and your battery size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes, it appears the charging system is working.

Even though your battery may be new, I'd replace it just to be sure it is not the culprit. It is possible to have a dead cell or two and still have 12+ volts, this can happen with some cheaper batteries.

A low battery/electrical charge will present itself with ever-decreasing lights and power, backfiring as the plugs start to fail to ignite all the time, and eventual deadness.

Also double check the wattage on your headlight and your battery size.
I replaced the battery already with one I used when I first started the post. So I have replaced the new battery once already, I don't think my Battery Source will swap it out again and honestly doubt it is the battery since it's been swapped already. Could it still be the stator not giving out enough power? I appreciate all the help you've given me so far Blue Ghost :thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Was able to get the DeOxit sprayed on pretty much every connector on the bike(all the charging cycle connectors for sure).. No luck

This is basically the verdict.

Bike before startup - 12.8v
Bike on with headlight plugged in - 12.5v and declines
Bike on with headlight unplugged - 12.9v - 13.5v when revving up

I took the bike on a ride for about 20minutes and came back with the battery sitting at 13.3v, this was without the headlight on. I didn't take it out with the headlight on because it would have drained my battery like in the past.

Shouldn't I be sitting closer to the 14v range right on startup without even having to revv up though?

When I tested the stator and resistance it seemed to be fine, along with testing the regulator. Any other suggestions?
 

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....Shouldn't I be sitting closer to the 14v range right on startup without even having to revv up though?

When I tested the stator and resistance it seemed to be fine, along with testing the regulator. Any other suggestions?
Here is what the traditional diagnosis for the charging system and battery has been.

Check the voltage at the battery terminals, and make sure to record the voltage down to the tenths: 12.6v vs. 12v. Check the following values:
  • After the bike has been sitting for days, key off: No lower than 12.2v, and even that's pretty low. You really want more like 12.6-12.8.

  • As you're cranking the starter: No less than 10v.

  • At idle: Voltage should be no lower than the "sitting voltage" you measured above.

  • In normal rpm range (4000-9000): 13.8v is ideal, but anything 13.5-13.8 is OK.

  • Immediately (within half an hour) after a ride of at least 10-15 miles at over 4000 rpm, engine and key off: 12.8v or more.

  • A day or two after that ride, key off: 12.6v or higher
If your battery doesn't meet these minimums, then either the battery's dying or the charging system isn't working correctly. Unless something catastrophic has happened (like a crash, vandalism, flooding, etc.) it's very likely to be the battery.
If the "normal rpm range" voltage reads higher than 13.8v, your voltage regulator may be failing. This will boil the battery dry from overcharging, and eventually start popping lights and causing other damage. This should be fixed as soon as possible.
 
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